Humility Post

I’m going to try to make a humility post once a week. We’ll see how that works out. 

Humility as was defined at Passport to Innovative Education includes recognizing that one needs others. This is the specific part I’m trying to work out. 

Tuesday I went to the doctor. Friday my ear started to hurt, by Monday I wasn’t sleeping and burping hurt like h*ll. I was positive I had an ear infection. Doctor said it’s not infected yet and gave me allergy meds and ear drops. It’s a good thing doctor’s are here. 

I have been looking for a part time job at a dance studio. The money is good in studios so there’s that. But I’m really looking forward to it. I miss the studio stuff. Most studios function like a family and I crave those relationships. The inspiration that I get from seeing others work is just not happening at school. Plus, I get to go back to competitions. I grew up in the competitive dance world and as much as others complain about it I love it. Without the genius of others I wouldn’t have any of this. 

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.
"Why Don’t the Unemployed Get Off Their Couches?" and Eight Other Critical Questions for Americans (via seriouslyamerica)

(via youknowyougrow)

Elizabeth Smart became a household name after she was kidnapped from her home in Salt Lake City, UT at the age of 14 and held in captivity for nine months. She was forced into a polygamous marriage, tethered to a metal cable, and raped daily until she was rescued from her captors nine months later. Smart was recovered while she and her kidnappers were walking down a suburban street, leading many Americans who followed her story on the national news to wonder: Why didn’t she just run away as soon as she was brought outside?

Speaking to an audience at Johns Hopkins about issues of human trafficking and sexual violence, Smart recently offered an answer to that question. She explained that some human trafficking victims don’t run away because they feel worthless after being raped, particularly if they have been raised in conservative cultures that push abstinence-only education and emphasize sexual purity:

Smart said she “felt so dirty and so filthy” after she was raped by her captor, and she understands why someone wouldn’t run “because of that alone.”

Smart spoke at a Johns Hopkins human trafficking forum, saying she was raised in a religious household and recalled a school teacher who spoke once about abstinence and compared sex to chewing gum.

“I thought, ‘Oh, my gosh, I’m that chewed up piece of gum, nobody re-chews a piece of gum, you throw it away.’ And that’s how easy it is to feel like you no longer have worth, you no longer have value,” Smart said. “Why would it even be worth screaming out? Why would it even make a difference if you are rescued? Your life still has no value.”

Elizabeth Smart: Abstinence Education Teaches Rape Victims They’re Worthless, Dirty, And Filthy

(via misandry-mermaid)

(via missknightinshiningarmor)

#YesAllWomen

Because my cousin shared 3 rape experiences she had
And on all three occasions
She was wearing sweats and was brutally beaten

So there goes your excuse
That my tight dress was asking for it
It might have escaped your attention,
But I don’t wake up in the mornings,
And put on a skirt thinking,
Will this get me raped?
I don’t put on a tank top hoping,
Maybe this one will.

#YesAllWomen

Because in school, they teach us that our bodies are offensive.

They pull us from classrooms
And hallways
Demanding if we have longer shorts,
Or even a sweater,
Reminding us that the boys are distracted,
That the boys go wild for a peeking shoulder,
Or the sight of a sun burned thigh,
Because their education is more important than ours.

#YesAllWomen

Because white men in pressed suits,
Expensive watches hanging from their wrists,
Red faces glinting with arrogance,
Have more say over my body than I do.

Because those same men,
Quoting the Bible and fake statistics,
Have never shed blood,
As a twisted sacrifice for being a woman.

Because those same men,
Have never walked the streets,
Fearing for their lives,
Clinging to keys between their fingers like a lifeline
With pepper spray in their bags,
Ready for someone to feel entitled to their body.

#YesAllWomen

Because when a man says no to us,
It is a fault in OUR character.
It is because we are not
Thin, tan, or perky enough for HIM.

Because when WE say no to a man,
Its still a fault in OUR character,
We are the cold, ruthless bitch,
Saying no to the nice guy,
Who offered to buy us a drink,
And Who complimented our hair.

#YesAllWomen

Because a UCSB entitled nine-teen year old boy,
Can record a video
Of his plans to shoot down all the
“Blond bimbos who denied him his right,”
And then do so,
Only to have his actions excused by the media,
Claiming he was depressed,
Instead of admitting that male entitlement is dangerous.

#YesAllWomen

Because I am done being silenced
And I am done being polite.
I am done sitting by
And watching
As a country hypocritically cries
Equality and justice
But doesn’t have equal pay
Lets men make decisions for a woman’s body
And blames the victim for the actions of a rapist.

#YesAllWomen

Because our NO won’t be enough one day.

#YesAllWomen

Because I wasn’t asking for it.

#YesAllWomen

Because “Boys Will Be Boys,” is still an excuse

#YesAllWomen

Because “Not All Men Are Like That,” is still a defense.

#YesAllWomen

Because enough blood has been spilled.

#YesAllWomen

Because I am sixteen years old, and I am so afraid, when I shouldn’t have to be.

W. R.

This poem was inspired by actual tweets from the #YesAllWomen trend on twitter. X

(via slytheringirl69)

(via missknightinshiningarmor)

yoiness:


© NYC Dance Project

Artem Ovcharenko, Bolshoi Ballet, New York City, USA (July 2014)

yoiness:

© NYC Dance Project

Artem Ovcharenko, Bolshoi Ballet, New York City, USA (July 2014)

(via danceistolivetoliveistodance)

iamlittlei:

I have said it before and I will say it again:

Train is absolutely the best to travel

I want to take a train somewhere.

Dance, Education, Food, Puppies, and other things.

Take THAT, David Bowie!

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